Conservative leadership candidate: climate change is not a 'scientific issue'

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Conservative leadership candidate Brad Trost says he knows "a little bit about science."

And from the "little bit" he's learned about science, Trost has reached the conclusion that climate change is not, in fact, a "scientific issue."

Here's what Trost had to say about climate change Wednesday night in Saskatoon during the first Conservative leadership debate:

"When I become Prime Minister, the war on oil and gas and coal is over ... Instead of wasting our time worrying about lowering emissions, we will concentrate on environmental priorities that make a difference. We pour billions of gallons of raw sewage into places like the Ottawa River, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, we don't need to concentrate on climate change – it's more of a political issue than a scientific issue."

Oddly, even the oil and gas industry recognizes the science behind climate change and is fully committed to efforts to reduce emissions through carbon pricing.

But a short while later, Trost had this to add:

"I don't think man-made greenhouse gases are a problem on the environment ... I'm being clear I don't think it's a priority."


To establish his authority on the issue, Trost cited his experience as a student of geophysics.

Who disagrees with that analysis? The Canadian Geophysicists Union, for one – they actually endorse the scientific consensus that "climate change has been caused by human action."

In fact, the CGU joined several Canadian scientific organizations in endorsing a 2009 letter that states:

"Greenhouse gases resulting from human activities contribute to the warming of the atmosphere and the oceans and constitute a serious risk to the health and safety of our society, as well as having an impact on all life." 

In addition to this opinion, Trost also opposes same-sex marriage and has stated he believes "God put conservatives on earth to stop taxes everywhere, forever."

Photo: CPAC.

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